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This article is a list of free-to-air channels in New Zealand. Most New Zealand homes already have a standard 60 cm satellite dish fitted which can pick up most of these channels, as these are also used or have been used in the past to pick up free-to-air and pay New Zealand television channels from Optus D1 and historically, Optus B1. A frequency scanning aka blind-scan capable set-top box can be used to locate other services.

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The following standards apply to all free-to-air television programmes broadcast in New Zealand.

Freedom of expression is the starting point in a consideration of complaints. Complaints can only be upheld where the limitation on the right to freedom of expression is reasonable, prescribed by law and demonstrably justified in a free and democratic society. The standards in this code should be read and interpreted alongside the Commentary on the standards section.

Current norms of good taste and decency should be maintained, consistent with the context of the programme and the wider context of the broadcast. The inclusion of helpline information should be considered. Broadcasters should ensure that programmes are correctly classified and screened in appropriate timebands, and where appropriate, issue an audience advisory where the content of a broadcast may not be suitable for likely viewers.

Programmes which exclude material likely to be unsuitable for children. Programmes may not necessarily be deed for child viewers but should not contain material likely to alarm or distress them. Programmes containing material more suited for mature audiences but not necessarily unsuitable for child viewers when subject to the guidance of a parent or an adult.

The freetvguide nz

The M classification means the programme might contain violence, sexual material, offensive language, adult themes, nudity, or other content that some children and parents find challenging. The programme may contain content with a moderate impact and themes that require a mature outlook. M programmes may be screened between 9am and 3pm on weekdays except during school and public holidays, as deated by the Ministry of Education and after 7.

Programmes classified 16 contain stronger material or special elements which are outside the M classification. These programmes may contain a greater degree of sexual material, offensive language, realistic violence, and stronger adult themes. Programmes classified 18 contain themes which may be challenging or offensive even to some adult viewers. These must be displayed at the beginning of programmes.

M, 16 and 18 classifications and advisory symbols must screen at the beginning of programmes and after each break. Broadcasters should exercise discernment when scheduling PG, M, 16 and 18 classified content, including during any transition from G or PG programming to M, 16 or 18 programming. Programmes must be correctly classified and screened during appropriate timebands and full advisories must be used where appropriate. Audience advisory symbols include:. C — content may offend. L — language may offend. V — contains violence.

The free-to-air television code

S — sexual content may offend. Broadcasters should ensure children can be protected from broadcasts which might adversely affect them. Where these are available, they should be clearly and regularly promoted to customers.

Broadcasters must use judgement and discretion when deciding the degree of graphic material to be included in news programmes, and should broadcast an audience advisory when appropriate, particularly when children are likely to be viewing.

Extra care should be taken in scheduling promos in programmes specifically aimed at child viewers so that the themes and material shown in the promo is not inappropriate for child viewers. Broadcasters should exercise care and discretion when portraying violence. Violent content should be appropriate to the context of the programme, and classified carefully. It should be classified carefully and carry audience advisory symbols and written advisories where necessary, in accordance with Standard 2 — Programme Information. Broadcasters should observe standards consistent with the maintenance of law and order, taking into the context of the programme and the wider context of the broadcast.

For example, a distinction will usually be drawn between factual, and fictional or dramatic depictions.

The availability of filtering technology and the level of public interest in a programme will also be a ificant factor. Broadcasters should not encourage discrimination against, or denigration of, any section of the community on of sex, sexual orientation, race, age, disability, occupational status or as a consequence of legitimate expression of religion, culture or political belief. In addition to compliance with laws or regulations relating to the promotion of alcohol, broadcasters should observe restrictions on the promotion of alcohol appropriate to the programme genre being broadcast.

Other guidelines under this standard should be considered. When controversial issues of public importance are discussed in news, current affairs or factual programmes, broadcasters should make reasonable efforts, or give reasonable opportunities, to present ificant points of view either in the same programme or in other programmes within the period of current interest.

List of free-to-air channels in new zealand

Broadcasters should make reasonable efforts to ensure that news, current affairs and factual programming:. Broadcasters should maintain standards consistent with the privacy of the individual. In some cases an individual may be identifiable even if they are not named or shown. In some circumstances, there may be a reasonable expectation of privacy in relation to such information or material even though it is in the public domain. The level of public interest must be proportionate to the seriousness of the breach of privacy in order for the defence to apply.

A parent or guardian, or other person aged 18 or over in loco parentis standing in the shoes of the parent or guardiancan consent on behalf of under the age of 16 years, but the broadcaster must be satisfied that the broadcast is not contrary to the best interests of the.

Broadcasters should deal fairly with any person or organisation taking part or referred to in any broadcast. Context should also be considered, including the public interest in the broadcast. The Free-to-air television code The following standards apply to all free-to-air television programmes broadcast in New Zealand.

Part 1 - Standards which relate to social responsibilities Standard 1 - Good Taste and Decency Current norms of good taste and decency should be maintained, consistent with the context of the programme and the wider context of the broadcast. Standard 2 - Programme Information Broadcasters should ensure that programmes are correctly classified and screened in appropriate timebands, and where appropriate, issue an audience advisory where the content of a broadcast may not be suitable for likely viewers. Guidelines 2a The following classifications should be broadcast on all content except news, current affairs, sports and live content: G — General: Approved for general viewing Programmes which exclude material likely to be unsuitable for children.

G programmes may be screened at any time. PG — Parental Guidance: Parental Guidance recommended for younger viewers Programmes containing material more suited for mature audiences but not necessarily unsuitable for child viewers when subject to the guidance of a parent or an adult. PG programmes may be screened at any time. M — Mature Audiences: Suitable for mature audiences 16 years and over The M classification means the programme might contain violence, sexual material, offensive language, adult themes, nudity, or other content that some children and parents find challenging.

Audience advisory symbols include: C — content may offend L — language may offend V — contains violence S — sexual content may offend 2h If a programme is likely to disturb or offend a ificant of viewers, or programme content is likely to be outside audience expectations, an appropriate written, or written and verbal, on-screen audience advisory warning should also be broadcast. Standard 3 - Children's Interests Broadcasters should ensure children can be protected from broadcasts which might adversely affect them. Guidelines 3ren may be protected through security systems, eg. Standard 4 - Violence Broadcasters should exercise care and discretion when portraying violence.

Guidelines 4a Any depiction of, Free to view nz reference to, violence should be justified by context. Judgement and discretion must be used in deciding the degree of graphic detail to be included in news programmes, particularly when children are likely to be watching.

An audience advisory should be used when appropriate. Standard 5 - Law and Order Broadcasters should observe standards consistent with the maintenance of law and order, taking into the context of the programme and the wider context of the broadcast.

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Guidelines 5a Programmes should not actively promote serious antisocial or illegal behaviour, including violence, suicide, serious crime and the abuse of drugs. Standard 6 - Discrimination and Denigration Broadcasters should not encourage discrimination against, or denigration of, any section of the community on of sex, sexual orientation, race, age, disability, occupational status or as a consequence of legitimate expression of religion, culture or political belief.

Standard 7 - Alcohol In addition to compliance with laws or regulations relating to the promotion of alcohol, broadcasters should observe restrictions on the promotion of alcohol appropriate to the programme genre being broadcast.

Guidelines 7a Alcohol promotion should be socially responsible and must not encourage consumption by people who are under the legal age to purchase alcohol. Part 2 - Standards which relate to information broadcast Standard 8 - Balance When controversial issues of public importance are discussed in news, current affairs or factual programmes, broadcasters should make reasonable efforts, or give reasonable opportunities, to present ificant points of view either in the same programme or in other programmes within the period of current interest.

Standard 9 - Accuracy Broadcasters should make reasonable efforts to ensure that news, current affairs and factual programming: is accurate in relation to all material points of fact does not mislead.

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Guidelines 9a The requirement for accuracy does not apply to statements which are clearly distinguishable as analysis, comment or opinion, rather than statements of fact. Part 3 - Standards which relate to people or organisations taking part or referred to in broadcasts Standard 10 - Privacy Broadcasters should maintain standards consistent with the privacy of the individual. Guidelines 10a The privacy standard applies only to identifiable individuals. Standard 11 - Fairness Broadcasters should deal fairly with any person or organisation taking part or referred to in any broadcast.

Guidelines 11a A consideration of what is fair will depend on the nature of the programme eg, news and current affairs, factual, dramatic, comedic or satirical.